Frankenstein And The Romantic Era Essay

Frankenstein And The Romantic Era Essay-84
may not seem to conform to the brighter tones and subjects of the poems of her husband Percy Bysshe Shelley, and their contemporaries and friends, William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley was a contemporary of the romantic poets.Despite this apparent difference, Mary Shelley was deeply influenced by the romantics, and the reader of is actually more sophisticated than the prose of other romantic writers, as this novel “initiates a rethinking of romantic rhetoric" (Guyer 77).

may not seem to conform to the brighter tones and subjects of the poems of her husband Percy Bysshe Shelley, and their contemporaries and friends, William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley was a contemporary of the romantic poets.Despite this apparent difference, Mary Shelley was deeply influenced by the romantics, and the reader of is actually more sophisticated than the prose of other romantic writers, as this novel “initiates a rethinking of romantic rhetoric" (Guyer 77).

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He must perfect the role of the scientist by attempting to accomplish the impossible, a process which is inevitably frustrated, as it must be, by the fact that overstepping human boundaries has significant consequences.

Shelley’s Frankenstein is not a mad scientist, as his character has been reduced to over the years, but a scientist who is passionate about the primary questions and preoccupations of his time.

The romantic period was characterized by a marked departure from the ideas and techniques of the literary period that preceded it, which was more scientific and rational in nature.

Romantic poetry and prose, by contrast, was intended to express a new and visionary relationship to the imagination (Fite 17).

In his Romantic quest for a scientific ideal—the perfect human—he creates a monster, who then must be held in check by other systems and institutions that humans have also created.

While these institutions are more concrete and based in reality than the creation of the monster, they are equally imperfect.In this sense, he is highly romantic., although to the reader familiar with romantic poetry, it may seem that nature is somewhat less important or less central than the role it plays, for example, in the poetry of Percy Shelley, or in the romanticism examples of poetry of Wordsworth, and Coleridge.Nonetheless, from the novel’s opening, the importance of the reader getting a sense of physical place is established by situating the text within a particular environment, the qualities of which will both mirror and contradict the inner states of the main characters.The Creature occupies a world that is bleak, that is attacked on all sides by an unforgiving set of conditions.Victor, his family, and the De Lacys occupy a world that has beauty, even though each has had to deal with occasional harsh realities.This is one of the ways in which Shelley, then, both embraces and simultaneously contests this particular romantic ideal.The moment which Shelley describes in Frankenstein is neither a moment recalled from her personal experience, such as a contemplative moment in nature, nor is the narrative voice her own, yet she is still portraying a particular quest to achieve the sublime.It is symbolic, of course, that Victor has chosen such a barren place to create the companion for the Creature.The contrast between the two places is as stark and distinct as the differences between Frankenstein’s Creature and the human world.In contrast, he recalls Switzerland as colorful and lively.He describes the Swiss hills in true Romanticismform as covered with verdant vines and the landscape as teeming with blue lakes that reflect the brilliant blue sky.

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