In My Room Essay'' Miller

In My Room Essay'' Miller-2
The law is only a word for what has a right to happen” (65).This is a law that the youthful Rodolpho instinctively knows–a “law” that he teaches to a willing pupil–Catherine. In 1991 when Arthur Miller visited Millersville University to receive an award for excellence in the humanities, I wanted to do something out of the ordinary to somehow call attention to the fact that high school students appreciate and understand the impact he has made in American letters.

The law is only a word for what has a right to happen” (65).This is a law that the youthful Rodolpho instinctively knows–a “law” that he teaches to a willing pupil–Catherine. In 1991 when Arthur Miller visited Millersville University to receive an award for excellence in the humanities, I wanted to do something out of the ordinary to somehow call attention to the fact that high school students appreciate and understand the impact he has made in American letters.

And when Miller claims that if a play is to achieve a “satisfactory realism,” the story must contain “a certain amplitude of sound . Certainly, young and older readers alike can appreciate the accusatory power that the young girls of Salem Village enjoy, albeit for a brief but turbulent period.

But there is little to admire about their motives and/or their intentions.

“(4), we know from that Miller lived and worked in the “dangerous and mysterious world at the water’s edge”(149).

The hopelessness he witnessed is echoed in Marco and Rudolpho’s accounts of Sicily throughout the play.

Most students agree that the passion that drives Eddie to his taboo kiss is driven more by his homophobic dread of Rodolpho as a “son-in-law” than by any genuine feelings of desire for Catherine.

Readers also note that Eddie is described as “unsteady, drunk” (61) as he enters the apartment.

for young readers seems to lie in the recognition of the need for a different kind of “bridge”–an understanding that will bridge the generation gap.

The intolerance shown by Eddie in his macho stance against Rodolpho is seen more as a lack of acceptance of anyone who is “different” than a sincere concern of a father-figure for the welfare of his ward.

What Eddie seems to represent more than anything else at this point is what critic Steven Centola recognizes as “the ideal father myth” (57).

Similar to ‘s Biff Loman’s recognition of this phenomenon, Catherine now understands Eddie’s “absurd conception of himself as above the law and his society” (Centola 57).

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