Ode To A Grecian Urn Analysis Essay

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The speaker says that the piper's "unheard" melody's are sweeter than to a mortal's ear or melody, because they are unaffected by time.

Though he can never kiss his lover because he is frozen in time, He should not grieve because her beauty will never fade.

Keats felt his poetry should effect the readers emotions, and only great poetry could move the reader to the point of enjoyment.

In doing this Keats felt the only way to achieve his goal of "moving his audience" was to surrender to uncertainties, Life is halted and can never continue from this point.

The authors of the early eighteenth century altered many of the earlier romantic pieces.

Ode To A Grecian Urn Analysis Essay

The early writers primary area of concern was nature.It was not until the ladder part of the eighteenth century that authors began to focus on the supernatural as well as nature.John Keats unique style of writing gave the world a great respect for his work.In the first stanza, the speaker, standing before an ancient Grecian urn uses apostrophe when he speaks to the urn as if it is alive.The speaker describes the pictures as if they are frozen in time.He is happy for the piper because his songs will be “for ever new,” and happy that the love of the boy and the girl will last forever, unlike mortal love, which lapses into “breathing human passion” and eventually vanishes, leaving behind only a “burning forehead, and a parching tongue.” In the fourth stanza, the speaker examines another picture on the urn, this one of a group of villagers leading a heifer to be sacrificed.He wonders where they are going (“To what green altar, O mysterious priest...”) and from where they have come.He imagines their little town, empty of all its citizens, and tells it that its streets will “for evermore” be silent, for those who have left it, frozen on the urn, will never return.In the final stanza, the speaker again addresses the urn itself, saying that it, like Eternity, “doth tease us out of thought.” He thinks that when his generation is long dead, the urn will remain, telling future generations its enigmatic lesson: “Beauty is truth, truth beauty.” The speaker says that that is the only thing the urn knows and the only thing it needs to know.In the third stanza, he looks at the trees surrounding the lovers, and feels happy that they will never shed their leaves; he is happy for the piper because his songs will be "for ever new," and happy that the love of the boy and the girl will last forever, unlike mortal love, which slowly turns into "breathing human passion," and eventually vanishes, leaving behind only a "burning forehead, and a parching tongue." In the fourth stanza, the speaker examines another picture on the urn, this one of a group of villagers leading a heifer to be sacrificed.He wonders where they are going "To what green altar, O mysterious priest...", and where they have come from.

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