The Almond Tree Essay

The Almond Tree Essay-55
Then pinks and gilliflowers, especially the matted pink and clove gilliflower. Then the honeysuckles, so they be somewhat afar off.Of beanflowers I speak not, because they are field flowers.I wish also, in the very middle, a fair mount, with three ascents, and alleys, enough for four to walk abreast; which I would have to be perfect circles, without any bulwarks or embossments; and the whole mount to be thirty foot high; and some fine banqueting-house, with some chimneys neatly cast, and without too much glass.

Then pinks and gilliflowers, especially the matted pink and clove gilliflower. Then the honeysuckles, so they be somewhat afar off.Of beanflowers I speak not, because they are field flowers.I wish also, in the very middle, a fair mount, with three ascents, and alleys, enough for four to walk abreast; which I would have to be perfect circles, without any bulwarks or embossments; and the whole mount to be thirty foot high; and some fine banqueting-house, with some chimneys neatly cast, and without too much glass.

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But there must be no alleys with hedges, at either end of this great enclosure; not at the hither end, for letting your prospect upon this fair hedge from the green; nor at the further end, for letting your prospect from the hedge, through the arches upon the heath.

For the ordering of the ground, within the great hedge, I leave it to variety of device; advising nevertheless, that whatsoever form you cast it into, first, it be not too busy, or full of work.

For gardens (speaking of those which are indeed princelike, as we have done of buildings), the contents ought not well to be under thirty acres of ground; and to be divided into three parts; a green in the entrance; a heath or desert in the going forth; and the main garden in the midst; besides alleys on both sides.

And I like well that four acres of ground be assigned to the green; six to the heath; four and four to either side; and twelve to the main garden.

But this hedge I intend to be raised upon a bank, not steep, but gently slope, of some six foot, set all with flowers.

Also I understand, that this square of the garden, should not be the whole breadth of the ground, but to leave on either side, ground enough for diversity of side alleys; unto which the two covert alleys of the green, may deliver you.As for the making of knots or figures, with divers colored earths, that they may lie under the windows of the house on that side which the garden stands, they be but toys; you may see as good sights, many times, in tarts.The garden is best to be square, encompassed on all the four sides with a stately arched hedge.But those which perfume the air most delightfully, not passed by as the rest, but being trodden upon and crushed, are three; that is, burnet, wildthyme, and watermints.Therefore you are to set whole alleys of them, to have the pleasure when you walk or tread.In October and the beginning of November come services; medlars; bullaces; roses cut or removed to come late; hollyhocks; and such like.These particulars are for the climate of London; but my meaning is perceived, that you may have ver perpetuum, as the place affords.Fountains I intend to be of two natures: the one that sprinkleth or spouteth water; the other a fair receipt of water, of some thirty or forty foot square, but without fish, or slime, or mud.For the first, the ornaments of images gilt, or of marble, which are in use, do well: but the main matter is so to convey the water, as it never stay, either in the bowls or in the cistern; that the water be never by rest discolored, green or red or the like; or gather any mossiness or putrefaction.Besides that, it is to be cleansed every day by the hand.Also some steps up to it, and some fine pavement about it, doth well.

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