The Complete Persepolis Essay

The Complete Persepolis Essay-70
The eyes of Marji and her peers are closed tightly in anger, which again represents the notion that their eyes are physically and symbolically shut — they are metaphorically veiled to believe that what they are told about the regime (even if it has not been proven to be accurate) is enough justification to outright attack someone they once considered to be amongst them.

The eyes of Marji and her peers are closed tightly in anger, which again represents the notion that their eyes are physically and symbolically shut — they are metaphorically veiled to believe that what they are told about the regime (even if it has not been proven to be accurate) is enough justification to outright attack someone they once considered to be amongst them.Marji is profoundly unveiled to the brutality of the regime when she hears of the torture that is exercised in Iran’s prisons. 8 depicts the brutal torture that political prisoner and family friend Ahmadi had to endure that led to his eventual assassination.3 deeply symbolizes Marji’s perception of the veil.

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The fact that Marji is seen to have a neutral facial expression depicts that she is unsure of which ideology is the one she should embrace, a question that plagues her throughout the course of .

The unpleasant truths about the regime are metaphorically unveiled to Satrapi, paralleling to her loss of innocence.

Satrapi uses this veil to symbolize her transitions in her , from her state of conformity, to her metaphorical unveiling of the truth behind the Islamic regime and ultimately her complete rebellion that leads to her eventual freedom.

We are immediately confronted by Satrapi’s conformity to the veil at the start of Persepolis.

A significant part of the caption reads, “I’m sitting on the far left so you don’t see me.” Satrapi has deliberately cropped herself out from the class photo, with just her left arm showing, for two particular reasons: To stress the idea that they all look exactly the same with the veil on — they are all just as faceless and insignificant as each other so it simply wouldn’t matter if she was in the photo of not.

Marji also does not want to associate herself with the regime nor does she want to adopt any of its principles — including wearing the veil; she does not want her class photo to be of her wearing a symbol of conformity and obedience.In Fig.1, Satrapi introduces herself to the reader and makes note that it is post-Islamic Revolution, when she was 10.One of the most telling panels, this depicts a somber Marjane (or Marji as she is known throughout Persepolis), looking directly at the reader, as a prisoner would silently crying for help, with her arms tightly folded as if to physically close her body off from the world.Here Marji is figuratively torn between what she was brought up to know and what she is curious to know — the world she was brought up in is depicted with images of working cogs, hammer and ruler to represent logic and reason, not associated with the veil.The other half depicts a world of fundamental Islam — Marji is shrouded by the veil as well as Islamic art of all things, to represent the fact that her notion of traditional Islamic faith is visual, not factual.It is this brutal force in the regime that kills Marji’s beloved uncle, Anoosh.After hearing the devastating news of his death, Marji experiences a significant turning point. 9, Marji firmly tells God (or her notion of God), who has come to console her, that she never wants to see him again.Note there are no panel walls; firstly because the Satrapi wants to make it clear that the effects of the torture are everlasting, and secondly the veil virtually has been lifted — the truth behind the brutality of the regime is out in the open to Marji and the Iranian people and it is so shocking and profound that it cannot be confined within panel walls.Marji can barely comprehend what she hears, and is astounded that a domestic appliance in her home, a single iron, could be used to end someone’s life with such brutality.She has been forced to wear a perceivably thick, black veil, and shows no enthusiasm about it.This is further elaborated in the next panel, fig.2.

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