Thesis Conclusion And Recommendation

Thesis Conclusion And Recommendation-40
Learning Support Centers in Higher Education » Resources » Articles, Presentations, Reviews, & Research » Dissertations & Theses » Sheets, R. (1994) The effects of training and experience on adult peer tutors in community colleges.» Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations This chapter will provide a summary of the purpose, methodology, and results of this study.Then, conclusions will be discussed based on researcher insights gained regarding study findings and limitations.

Research question one was expanded to include the following hypotheses: H0.1: There are no significant differences in the total mean score on the TSORA among three groups of tutors, those with 1) no training, 2) 0-9.9 hours of training, and 3) 10 or more hours of training, based on the amount of training offered during the study.

H0.2: There are no significant differences in any one of the six sub-test mean scores on the TSORA among three groups of tutors, those with 1) no training, 2) 0-.9 hours of training, and 3) 1 or more hours of training, based on the amount of training offered during the study in each of the following six sub-test topics: a) Definition of tutoring and tutoring responsibilities b) Active listening and paraphrasing c) Setting goals/planning d) Modeling problem-solving e) Referral skills f) Study skills Research question two was expanded to include the following two hypotheses (H0.3 and H0.4).

One study (Brandwein & Di Vittis, 1985) provided valuable insights into the research design, the design of the instruments developed, and the methodology used for this study.

Brandwein and Di Vittis (1985) investigated the effects of training using a researcher-created multiple choice instrument.

Many of the studies used informal comments or evaluations by tutors to assess the effects of the training provided.

The design and limitations of the studies reviewed provided the impetus for the research design and for the researcher-created instruments used in this study.

Metacognition is described as the active monitoring, regulation, and orchestration of learning activities.

Together, constructivism and metacognition lay the foundation for establishing the need, developing a process, and identifying outcomes for tutor training.

The first two research questions were expanded to investigate effects on total scores and on sub-test scores by topic.

The third research question was expanded to include identified variables for investigation.

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